Make your own free website on Tripod.com
 

  Andy's Antiques Page.

CHAIRS


one of a pair of country Mahogany Sheraton style 
chairs  c1800.

Elm Provincial Hepplewhite chair
 c1790

New Zealand chair, native timber 
made by an early settler c1840
has beautiful ware on the front rung.

Country farm house Chippendale 
Elm chair c1775

Regency Elbowchair
mahogany c1810

Windsor chair c1840 one of three

Another Provincial chair
in the Chippendale style
Elm c1780

 oak Library chair c1835
the front castors are not original they should be brass like the back ones which are original

George I style fruitwood chair
C1725

mahogany Sheraton chair c1800.

mahogany Hepplewhite
chair c1780 the front lege have spade feet which the photo doesn't show very good

mahogany Sheraton chair c1810,
the rope type rail was brought in to commemorate the death of Admiral Lord Nelson in 1805.

Ladder back chair c1790

Country Hepplewhite
Elm chair c1780.

spindle back chair c1790.

Farmhouse Cottage Chair 
pine c1820

Walnut Restoration Chair
c1670

Windsor ElbowChair c1790

Oak Chair c1695

Walnut Chair 1724
poor photo but has the date
carved into back it would have been made in one of the middle European countries

Provincial Chippendale
Mahogany Chair c1755

It is not exactly a chair but you can 
sit on it.
Oak linenfold back settle c1640.
from 1600 linenfold was out of date
this settle was most likely made by a
country carpenter who had some linenfold lying around in his workshop.

carved arm chair Chair 
made in India for an English settler
it must have taken months the wood
is very heavy (ebony)? c1855

Provincial 
Chippendale style
chair c1815

one of a pair of Cottage Sheraton style
Fruitwood chairs c1835
I saw them in a real junky junk store at under $100

Windsor Elbowchair 
c1830

Elm cottage Elbowchair 
with traces of Chippendale
& Hepplewhite made 
by Village carpenter  c1800.

Mahogany Elbowchair
Chippendale c.1775
front view


A side view of the 
same chair.

19th. century African
Ashanti tribal 
Chiefs Stool
taken home by an English soldier as a
souvenir from the Ashanti wars of the 1880s

                                                                                That's all for now.

Some how I dont think that I will buy any more chairs I have enough.



 

Please press

Thank you for visiting me,
please come again.

                 Click here to contact Andy